Thrombophilia

Also known as: acquired thrombophilia, inherited thrombophilia, hypercoagulable state

What is thrombophilia?

Thrombophilia is an abnormality of the normal blood clotting mechanisms. This increases the chance of blood vessels clotting (thrombosis) anywhere in the body (arteries and veins). Infants commonly present with Thrombophilia in the first six months of life. There are two types of Thrombophilia-Genetic inherited and acquired where the clotting abnormality is related to some other disease process.
 

What causes thrombophilia?

Thromboses in children has many causes. In some, thrombophilia is a genetic disorder that is inherited from the parents. In others, cancer, cardiac disease, a catheter in a vessel, an antibody which is found to enhance clotting, obesity, immobility, and trauma are common causes. In older adolescents smoking and oral contraceptive use increase clotting risk.
 

What are the symptoms of thrombophilia?

Symptoms depend on the size and position of the clot. If a clot forms and gets lodged in a vein, it can cause symptoms such as pain and swelling, chest pain, trouble breathing or even severe complications like heart attack or stroke.

What are thrombophilia care options?

Treatment depends on the cause-frequently anticoagulants (medicines which act against clotting), medicines to breakup the clot/s and/or the replacement of substances that control clotting are used. Again, depending on the cause of the clotting, treatments might be needed for either a short or long period of time.

Reviewed by: Jack Wolfsdorf, MD, FAAP

This page was last updated on: 3/17/2017 2:52:39 PM

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