Lymphomas

Also known as: Hodgkin lymphoma, Hodgkin’s lymphoma, Hodgkin disease, Hodgkin’s disease, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, NHL

What is Lymphoma?

Lymphoma is group of blood cell cancers/tumors that start in cells that are part of the body’s immune/lymphatic system (which play an important role in fighting off infection), that then multiply creating a tumor mass in the body. The tumor cells can spread to the rest of the body. The two main groups of lymphoma are Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin forms of lymphoma (about 90%) (the World Health Organization includes two other categories as types of lymphomas- multiple myeloma and immunoproliferative disease). There are many subtypes that can impact your/your child’s body, and the difference is related to the cells that are involved. Tumors and their cells can spread throughout the body through the lymph system as well as to other types of tissue within the body.

What causes lymphoma?

Lymphoma appears to be related to a genetic mutation. In some cases, this can be passed along from parents to children. Some environmental factors can increase one’s risk of getting lymphoma, such as certain viral diseases, problems with one’s immune system or exposure to radiation or other hazardous chemicals and medications.

What are the symptoms of lymphoma?

Signs and symptoms of lymphoma may include painless swelling of lymph nodes in one's armpits, neck or groin, fatigue, fever, night sweats, loss of appetite, and weight loss.

What are lymphoma care options?

Treatment may include one or more of the following: chemotherapy, radiation therapy and other drugs known as biological therapy (targeted therapy). Blood or bone marrow transplant is reserved for patients at high risk or those with recurrent disease.


Reviewed by: Jack Wolfsdorf, MD, FAAP

This page was last updated on: 5/23/2018 2:46:46 PM


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From the Newsdesk

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07/06/2018 — More than two dozen children attended the Bear Hug camp at Nicklaus Children's last week. This day camp is for siblings of pediatric cancer patients to encourage socialization among peers and help them gain insight on their siblings' care journey. 
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