Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)

Also known as: AML, acute Meylogenous Leukemia, acute non-lymphocytic leukemia.

What is myeloid leukemia?

Acute myeloid leukemia is a leukemia that starts in the bone marrow (the tissue inside the bone where blood is made) and results in the creation of immature white blood cells. The normal blood cells are white cells that fight infection, red cells that carry oxygen and platelets that help with clotting.  Without those healthy cells, the child will be prone to infection, will not have energy and will be bleeding.  

What causes acute myeloid leukemia? 

The cause of Leukemia is unknown.  Leukemia is sometimes related to a change in the genes. Being exposed to radiation or certain chemicals or having certain other illnesses can put you at a greater risk of getting leukemia.

What are the symptoms of acute myeloid leukemia? 

People with leukemia may experience weakness, fatigue, fever, weight loss, bleeding or bruising, red spots on the skin, sweating, or bone pain.

What are leukemia care options? 

Chemotherapy is the most common treatment for AML. Blood or marrow transplantation may be considered for children with high-risk disease, or those with recurrent disease. 


Reviewed by: Kamar Godder, MD

This page was last updated on: 9/17/2018 11:57:35 AM


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